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Just because you see risks…doesn’t mean the market will price it in (yet)

I used to believe that risks to the market get priced into the market.

This is based off the efficient markets hypothesis. Once information is known it immediately gets priced into the market.

However, risks don’t always get priced in (right away) for one reason or another. Perhaps those risks are further off the horizon than believed. Perhaps those risks are going to dissipate soon. Perhaps those risks are not as significant as I believed they were.

Whatever the case may be, the market doesn’t always price in risks to the market right away.

Lesson learned

In October, I saw numerous risks to the market and strongly believed we would move down another leg lower in the S&P 500. I placed my bets accordingly, and it did not work out at all.

What risks did I see? A hiccup in the overnight repo market, beginning in mid-September. Hong Kong protests taking place every weekend, and U.S. Government officials denouncing China and supporting Hong Kong protestors. No signs of a real trade deal of significance. Slowing economic growth across the globe. A collaterialized loan market that’s looking more and more frothy.

I saw all of the risks, and here we are with the S&P 500 up 8.8% since October 8th, when the Fed made it known they would begin expanding their balance sheet with the purchase of Treasury Bills.

Markets are not efficient

Information can be priced in right away. Information can be ignored for days, weeks, months, or even years.

Risks can be priced in one week, and completely ignored the next week.

Markets are manipulated. No doubt about it.

But blaming my poor performance this month on market manipulation is irresponsible and definitely not a recipe for success.

I must learn how to trade around uncertainty and market manipulation caused by institutions and central banks across the world.

Trade the market you have, not the market you want.

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Author: Trader Court

CPA first, pivoted to python programmer focused on data science which I apply to my own stock and options trading.

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